Beverages

Water is one of our most precious natural resources. It’s also a building block of life. So it’s no wonder that water, especially the fluoridated kind that most often comes from your tap, is the best beverage for your oral health and overall wellness.

Simply staying hydrated is one of your body’s best defenses against tooth decay and gum disease, so consuming enough water daily is vital. When your mouth is dry, it creates an environment in your mouth that helps to breed the bacteria that cause cavities and disease.

And with the popularity of bottled water, many people are under the assumption that all water is good for your mouth and gums. However, many bottled water brands contain pH levels significantly lower than pure water. Lower pH means higher acid content – which can be harmful to the enamel of your teeth. Look for the pH level indicated on the label of bottled water before you drink it.

Besides water, most other beverages such as juice, energy drinks, sports drinks, alcoholic beverages and soft drinks contain large amounts of sugar and acid, which can feed bacteria in the mouth. Limiting these types of drinks can help you win the battle against gum and tooth decay. Oftentimes, labels can be misleading on beverages with claims like sugar-free, low or zero calorie, and all-natural; these products can still contain high acidity levels that put your mouth and teeth at risk.

Coffee and tea are serious culprits when it comes to staining your teeth’s enamel. Since most people are unwilling to give up the coffee or tea habit, you can try to limit the frequency in which you consume these beverages and remember to rinse your mouth with water after drinking.

Sources:

Does tea stain teeth? Colgate

How does coffee stain teeth? Colgate

What is the Worst Drink for Your Teeth? Avoid These Five; Colgate

How much calcium do children & Teens need? What are good sources of calcium? National Institutes of Health

Is Your Drinking Water Acidic? A Comparison of the Varied pH of Popular Bottled Waters; Journal of Dental Hygiene; June 2015